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. >> next a look at the fbi and its role in investigating cyber related crimes. from this morning's "washington journal" this is about 45 minutes. >> this week's segment involving your money will look at the fbi's role in fighting cyber crimes. and we are talking about-based terrorism, espionage. computer intrusions, major cyber fraud. will learn a little bit, then we will get to your calls and will learn a little bit first from shawn henry, who was the fbi's executive director for criminal and cyber programs. and been in a peer for quite a number of years by thank you for joining us. >> thanks are having. spent first of all what exactly is a cybercrime? >> when you talk about cyber, i think danger to any type of criminal activity that involves the use of the computer i think that's what most people talk about. when i talk about cybercrime on focusing on intrusions into computer networks. so those networks that we all use every single day come to increase efficiency and effectiveness in and our productivity. but those very same things that make those networks were effective for us
in quality. the fbi had some skilled interrogators and some of the best intelligence we got from high-value detainees came from high-level special agents and the fbi. but for the most part this nation was caught flatfooted, well-prepared to do large-scale interrogations', and we have slowly, slowly tried to improve that. i think to the obama administration's credit when he came into office to set up something called the high
to the pentagon and ig on the one hand and to the fbi with regards to general petraeus. >> but he's not, i mean big picture watching this, shaking his head saying, guys, we need a more sense of leadership here? >> he's not going to make a grand pronouncement or decisions about things based on, you know, two situations, two individual cases. he's focused on the missions that the military's tasked with carrying out and the cia and the general intelligence community tasked with carrying out, and with acting overall agenda which encompasses not just national security policy, but obviously domestic policy. >> thank you. >> yes. >> jay, has the president spoke to general allen directly? >> not that i'm aware of, no. >> spoke with secretary panetta? >> i have to check that. secretary panetta has been traveling. >> as a follow-up question, does the president see this in general as an unwelcomed distraction at a time when she's just -- was re-elected, and he has a bunch of priorities in terms of the fiscal cliff and in terms of the cabinet? >> well, i certainly, i think wouldn't call it welcome, but obv
in the contractors who carried in quality. the fbi had a skull the interrogators from the high value detainee's that came from higher levels special allegiance but for the most part this was caught flatfooted and they were prepared to do large-scale. we have slowly tried to improve that. to the obama's administration credit he said the high value detainee interrogation group which is an agency group which sends out interrogators' every time a high value is teaching and there is a research unit that stood out to study best practices and spend them out into the training academies thus training practices about interrogation and that's been up and running for a few years and has already -- i know improved training techniques to respect michael skerker is a professor of the u.s. naval academy and the author of this book's an ethics of interrogation. here it is. this is book tv at the u.s. naval academy. >>> professor maochun yu talked with the strategic services in china and the failure and success. this interview which was of the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland is a part of booktv colleg
of the fbi's cyber division. he held the highest ranking position in the fbi's cyber division, and he will be playing, um, the fbi director. so we have general cartwright playing the role of national security adviser, bill lynn is the secretary of defense -- um, this is perfect because it's halloween, so it's kind of even easier to play roles. [laughter] and we have steve to bin sky head of the fbi. and on your, on your screens you'll also see when your names come up, you'll see the roles that they're playing, and on your table we also have the agenda. and dmitri is the co-founder and chief technology officer for cloud strike, he's a computer security researcher, he helps focus business and governments on how to protect their intellectual property. and dmitri is going to play the role of the ceo of the oil company that gets hit in this exercise. dmitri is on the final end. and we have james lewis beside him, he's a senior fellow and program director for csis, he's worked at the state department and commerce, and he's a leading global expert on cyber. in 2010 he was with the united nat
, the uniform crime numbers you're talking about, that's the numbers that the fbi uses to look at crimes so people report. there is a, the other, which i think you're familiar with, the other one that has to do with -- includes home invasion, kidnapping, and the other things that people included. the fbi is slowly shifting over the area. the state of texas got a federal grant years ago to do that shift except when i got my fbi briefing, texas is only at 12%. we can start doing that, you know, categorizing more numbers to get this for the people, people want, but, but, we got to remember we don't want to overload our law enforcement, fill out paperworks like we did with teachers some time ago. we want them on the street rather than filling out paperwork, but the state of texas, actually, is doing some of that. we just put money there in the state of texas, get all the figures that you want to. >> we spoke about this briefly, and i want to ask before i head to questions from the audience. two years from now, you may be campaigning for higher office -- >> [inaudible] >> when the website was la
are strong. you can identify that pattern and when and former partners. dhs, fbi, cia, the white house, we sit on these policy boards so that we can all collectively address the problem that will take us into the next century. our best defense is going to be understanding the offense. as an intelligence organization, we spend a lot of time in the offensive mud. we collect human intelligence. as they consider ways to address the threats in the 21st century, left to also understand they're not all technology base. you all of legislation that drives what you do every day. i would anticipate this year, senator collins introduced a cyber security bill. it was geared towards a single owner of all things cyber. it is kind of hard when you have millions of people working for the government. in the end, you'll see cyber legislation that addresses standards of operating -- operating standards of performance, standards of protection, and how each agency does it will be very different. so much like a common definition lexicon, there will be standards. laws that can define acceptable behavior in cybers
to the normal criminal element. and the third is what f.b.i. director robert mueller said, there is a very real possibility trainees will recruit more terrorists from among the federal inmate population and continue al qaeda operations from the inside, which is how the new york synagogue bombers were recruited. all of these things are -- we shouldn't even be debating this. the ayotte amendment is one that would take care of this. we don't have to worry about it from year to year. we don't have to anguish over this thing that we've decided several times. i can remember, i guess it was back in the early administration of obama, when he identified 17 areas in the united states that would be appropriate for incarcerating terrorists, that we would take out of gitmo. and one of those places happened to be fort sill in my state of oklahoma. i went down to fort sill. i looked at the facility that we had that was housed within fort sill facility. and there was a lady there whose name was sergeant major carter. i can remember when she came up to me, she said, senator, why in the world -- go back and tell
and there. petty thefts but it was adding up and it's a federal crime. so the fbi staked out these trucks and filmed them stealing. we pulled the trucks back to the loading dock in oklahoma. these are trucks from koch industry, trucks that had an agreement that they were just cheating. it wasn't just driver stealing off the top and selling them to broke broque ers. not exact but because on the loading dock a big tall white guy was standing there saying i want more, more overage. now overage, term used for the skim and the guy standing there calling for more ore bridge was charles should -- charles koch i have one question as an investigator. the guy was already worth billions at that time. today he's worth over $20 billion. he got it from his daddy who had built oil refineries for joe stalin and made a billion and came back to the u.s. and founded the john birch society so the koch brothers got their money field fascist way. silvie already had his billions, so why? why does he need a couple of bucks from a poor indian family in the middle of oklahoma? and i know the answer because the s
this and other programs online by booktv.org. >> david cherry has resigned on friday after an fbi investigation into e-mail security that has uncovered evidence of an extramarital affair between here and his biographer, paula broadwell. next, we air a book edited by paula broadwell. it reflects his military career and the wars in iraq and afghanistan. for about an hour at politics & prose in washington dc. >> evening, i am bradley graham, co-owner of politics & prose with my wife melissa. on behalf of the entire staff, i would like to welcome me you here. before turning to our guest author, i would just like to say a word about an important event coming up this april. it is being called world book night and it is an ambitious attempt to hand out 1 million free books around the united states. you can read about how this amazing effort is being organized, and sign up to get involved yourself at us.worldbooknight.org. the deadline is tonight, but there is still time after this event. now, a word about our guest this evening, paula broadwell. also, vernon loeb. and the new book, "all in: the educa
finance, has meant by this gem smuggling operation. in fact, what they later found out that the fbi and cia were some of those have even showed up in shame shops in arizona. so you will find these gems to finance this whole campaign. again gordon back to this was the valley, the captain on the two new tactic with the plan was flawed. but even though the news that it was flawed, and that there was incredible danger and they would have to climb to the top of the mountain to get to this compound with a new it was surrounded by some of that, you know, some of the best mercenary so to speak at what really trained mercenaries were fighting for that 10 years. they still went and they still went to carry out this mission. i think you can describe a little bit of what happened when they went. >> okay, so they take off on the border of jalalabad and fly into this valley. there is some concern at this point obviously. there's concerned about the welfare comment there's a certain when that they could get in before the cloud cover can. they had to work quickly as well
various leading government officials up there all back that up, including director of the fbi. i'm paraphrasing, but he said these two categories of companies. those that have been compromised and will be gorgeous so delicate. so that's the shocking statistics to take. it is not uncommon for a credit card company to come back to emerge it and say hey, our threat vector detection system is more sophisticated than yours. we are picking up some indications he been compromised. here's what you need to look at. some recent examples of some very high profile and public incidents that have occurred recently. rsa, the cybersecurity company files was breached in 2011 and that led to a number of other breaches because their systems are used by many companies to provide this company's own security systems. in addition, there is a classic financial crimes case involving sony. i think that one of the takeaways from these examples is that these are not -- these are companies technologically sophisticated pressure in the cyberworld and they themselves were reached. so these are wal-marts for co
's going to be an 8.2% across-the-board cut in education, job training and health, housing, fbi, air traffic controllers from the food safety, entire range of domestic programs. for education if you count headstart, which is at the department of health and human services a $4.8 billion cut would be the largest education cuts ever in the history of the country. that would just move us -- essentially move us backwards on whether the goal is closing achievement gaps come increasing high school graduation rates, increasing college access and college completion. our biggest challenge in the short-term this lame-duck lame-duck session this to work together with groups like the urban league and national council to come up with a balanced approach to deficit reduction. as genocide, as people who can pay more to do so without balancing the budget on the backs of children and students and working people and low-income people. the other cop couple quick things i want to say is we are facing increased enrollment expected to go to the next decade, both of elementary secondary level. we have now 2
on the specifics of the investigation. the fbi has its own protocols in terms of how they proceed. and i'm going to let director mueller and others examine those protocols, and make some statements to the public generally. i do want to emphasize what i said before. general petraeus had an extraordinary career. deserved this country with great distinction in iraq, in afghanistan, and as head of the cia. by his own assessment, he did not meet the standards that he felt were necessary as the director of cia with respect to this personal matter that he is now dealing with, with his family, and with his wife. and it's on that basis that he tendered his resignation, and it's on that basis that i accepted it. but i want to emphasize that from my perspective at least, he has provided this country and extraordinary service. we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done, and my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on, and that this instead of being -- this into a being a single side note on what has been otherwise been an extraordinary career. [inaudible] >> you kn
in education and job-training and health and housing and the fbi coming air-traffic control, food safety, an entire range of domestic programs. for education that can't be what you count head start for the department of health and human services. it's to be about a $4.8 billion cut, the largest education cut ever in history of the country that would move us further essentially move us backwards on whether the goal is closing achievement gap, increasing high school graduation rates, increasing kawlija access and college completion so our biggest challenge in the short term is to work together with groups like the urban league and the national council of la raza and others to come up with a balanced approach on the deficit reduction and as janet said, ask people who can afford to pay a lot more to do so without balancing the budget on the backs of children and students and working people and low-income people. there's a couple quick things i want to say that we are also facing increasing enrollment expected to go up in the next decade with the elementary and secondary level even faster tha
coastal town in california. he was the subject, on the fbi most wanted list and responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pak
was founded in coastal town in was on the fbi's most wanted list and responsible for the murders in boston. there is no evidence to suggest that and it's hard to prove that we have the compound that has been translated if there was a smoking gun. if it was a smoking gun proving the relations are not so good that we wouldn't have pointed out. is it the difference it and the diplomats and journalists similar than they know. there is no evidence that i have seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being. this led to the problem this was for the pakistani military and intelligence and a different question that we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they do that he was there at that time. >> in 2003 on the two locations al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and that pakistan the state has been quite helpful and the operational commander of 9/11. they are held on al qaeda when it comes to the taliban as a separate story. i won't let you off the hook. the new america foundation if you're interested in drones to keep track of the drone strike
qaeda? is that right? so if our military is authorized to use force, they don't have to call the f.b.i. or the virginia state police to shoot. they can shoot themselves against an enemy coming at them in america. mr. levin: coming here and attacking us, a navy base or at a -- mr. graham: sliewlg. right. because we're not fighting a crime. we don't have to disarm our military and call the local cops, "would you please shoot these people they get here." no, we're going to shoot you. if you get in a boat asked to attack a military ship or boat in the united states, we're going to shoot you. and if we wound you, we're going to capture you. and then here's what we're going to do to you, incident of using force. the supreme court has said that when you authorize to use force, it makes no sense to give that authorization if you don't have the power to detain. because the worst thing you could do to the american military is to make them to kill everybody and capture no one. or let the other -- or let them go. so kill them all is not good policy and it's a bad spot to put your military in, and
was crawling with fbi agents. everybody knew because they were wearing tweed jackets. a terrible thing to wear in santa fe. some real serious espionage went on. that is great drama. i went to santa fe to walk around the streets that characters walk around. i find that very hopeful. >> i wondered when i came to buffalo with a you had gone to buffalo. >> oh yes. a couple times i have been to buffalo. the other thing is buffalo features heavily in the first book, and 1 hundred years ago was a very different place from what it is like today. nevertheless i went and looked around but i got ahold of old maps, the buffalo blue book which was the list of high society people in town, got newspapers that were published in newspapers published at the time and walking around is never enough, but it is a good basis. >> gives you a feel for the place. in doing research, it is one thing if you do your research but are you able to do your own research in a book like this that covers so much? >> i have to do it. other people wouldn't know what i was looking for. i do have helped in finding stuff. i use a resea
are not having a war on your orders and making sure the international community sends billions of fbi success and making sure that the people see results for their elections, and political success is making sure that hamas and gaza doesn't govern the relationship with egypt but that egypt governs the relationship with a hamas. if this is the root of the government of egypt pursues, then the potential for the working relationship with israel is possible. if it tries to achieve political success in the it the logical means, then we in the united states will be in a very difficult position and the israelis will be in an even more difficult position. .. >> you have a question earlier. no? okay, howard. >> ten years ago we were frantically trying to buy stinger missiles in bosnia should probably gotten there from afghanistan. the question i have come is if we do consider legal support to the syria and freedom fighters, how do we manage especially when it comes to no presence at all, how do we manage to control where those go and how they might get used? >> when i made a reference to seeing the nee
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
agencies who carry firearms in the government. i don't mind the police or the fbi, well, the department of agricultural has a swat team. the fish and wildlife have a swat team. they raided gibson guitar with guns drawn, took their computer equipment. when they accused them of something which was breaking a foreign regulation. a law in india they were accused of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in the india. those are the kind of stories we write about. >> how come we haven't heard about that before? >> some of them you have heard. one the case of john and judy. they were selling bun anies in missouri. they fined $95,000 for having a wrong permit. the government said you can pay on the website. if you don't pay in thirty days you'll owe $3.1 billion. it's the kind of stuff the government is doing to bully people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they're doing the same with confiscating people's land and saying you can't build on it because it's a wetland. even though there isn't a pond or stream on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >>
the fbi that is the national organization that has the resources to do the things that local jurisdictions, whether state or local don't have the resources to do. i believe that it's possible to have speed you can see this "washington journal" segment at our website, c-span.org. live now to the senate floor on foreign relations for remarks from the recommendations commission chair julius genachowski. is expected to discuss international telecommunications policy. this is just getting underway. >> very excited to be here today. is perhaps the most anticipated cfr event and much as the new james bond movie. i'm glad that chairman could join us today. just a quick introduction, prior to his fcc opponent, chairman genachowski was chief of business operations before that general counsel at iac interactive corp., special advisor and cofounder of the technology incubator lunchbox digital. his full bio is in your packages. i will turn over to the chairman for some quick opening remarks. we'll been going to the conversation where i follow up with some questions, and then after that we will open up
don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors conducted one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said the night of the attack, as of this date. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends felt like a john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision about ambassador bolton's qualifications. john bolton, the then ambassador, and democratic saying we're not going to go, we're not going to consider this domination domination in till we get basic answers to our concern. all i can do is that the concerns i have are greater today than they were before, and we're not even close to getting the basic answers. [inaudible] >> i have many more questions that need to be answered. [inaudible] >> ambassador rice released a statement about that meeting with senators mccain, graham and kelly ayotte saying in part in the course of the meeting we explained that the talking points provided by the intelligence community and the initial assessment upon which they were based were incorrect in the key respect. there
to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to the american people what was going on in the bailouts. to help guide treasury who is in charge of implementing the program to make sure the policy goals would be implemented. as mike is telling me about this, i had no idea why he was telling me until he said he was going to recommend me to the white house for this job. i was not interested in going to washington, i really had no interest in going back, and i started picking through the reasons to mike, getting rare my -- married in january, just started the mortgage fraud group, a big trial working years on to try coming up, and mike knocked my objections d
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25